Get Your Children Moving - It May Just Improve Their Grades

When children and adolescents participate in the recommended level of physical activity — at least 60 minutes daily — multiple health benefits occur. Most youths, however, do not engage in recommended levels of physical activity. Regular physical activity builds healthy bones and muscle, reduces the risk for developing chronic disease, improves self-esteem, and so much more.

Thinking on Your Feet

The eight hour work day lends itself to a lot of sitting. We know movement is better for your health than staying idle but now scientists want to know whether taking a break from sitting makes you think better.

Loneliness is a Mind Killer -- Study Shows Link to Rapid Cognitive Decline in Older Adults

Loneliness, an undesirable social condition, has links to cognitive health risks.

Healthy Heart in 20s Means Healthy Brain in 40s.

Taking steps to improve your heart health early in life can help prevent brain shrinkage as you age, a new Neurology study reports. Researchers discovered people who had better heart health scores also had a higher average brain volume as a percentage of their total head size in middle age.

Study shows protein in human umbilical cord blood rejuvenates old mice’s impaired learning, memory

Umbilical cord blood from human newborns, and in particular a single protein contained in it, boosted old mice’s brain function and cognitive performance, new research from Stanford shows.

How Being Creatively Funny Changes the Brain

When your sense of humor is tickled, what happens to your brain? How does the brain respond? Researchers at the University of Southern California pinpoint the regions of the brain that spark during the telling of a funny story.

Brain Games Claim Fail A Big Scientific Test

When a team of researchers evaluated the scientific literature on brain games, they found little evidence that the products improve memory or thinking in real-world tasks.

How Your BMI Might Affect Your Brain Function

According to researchers at the University of Arizona, older adults with higher BMI (body mass index) tend to have more inflammation in the body, which in turn may negatively impact cognition.

Healthy Living Equals Better Brain Function

A healthy lifestyle may help to increase executive function, a new study reports.

Caffeine Consumption in Older Women Seems to Reduce Risk of Dementia

Downing your favorite caffeine beverage can pull you through the day's sluggish moments; but in women, age 65 and over, caffeine seems to have the added benefit of reducing the odds of developing dementia.